Attractions and Places to Visit in Aberdeen

The attractions of Aberdeen are certainly varied. When you've visited the following highlights, you can explore the glorious countryside of Aberdeenshire too. Aberdeen the "Granite City" of Scotland is the perfect place for a holiday with a wide range of shops and local attractions.

Aberdeen Music Hall plays host to an ever widening range of events. Programme of Classical, Folk, Rock, Pop and Jazz music are equally at home in the Hall while Exhibitions, Seminars, Conferences, Graduation Balls, Tea Dances and Craft Fairs all find a professional welcome. The Aberdeen Exhibition & Conference Centre, the north's premier meeting and events venue, boasts state-of-the art convention facilities, capable of housing up to 2000 delegates. The AECC website provides further information, events and activities.

Aberdeen is an excellent base for the Malt Whisky Trail with the opportunity to visit whisky distilleries, and the fascinating Castle Trail. Royal Deeside is also nearby, including historical Balmoral Castle, the Scottish home of the Royal Family. The western half of Royal Deeside lies within the Cairngorms National Park and much of the area consists of beautiful mountains and glens. It is very sparsely populated with the biggest centre, Banchory, having a population of a few thousand people. Ballater, Aboyne and Braemar are other towns which are of interest to tourists.

Although Aberdeen is famous for having some of the best nightclubs in the world, the island also has an absolutely beautiful coastline with dozens of tiny coves to discover.

Aberdeen Art Gallery, close to His Majesty's Theatre, holds a fine collection of paintings, sculpture, silver and ceramics. Aberdeen Maritime Museum tells the story of the city's long relationship with the sea. The Tolbooth Museum focuses on the history of crime and punishment within Aberdeen. Aberdeen is famous as the gateway to two of the most famous trails in the world, The Malt Whisky Trail and the Castle Trail. The castles and distilleries featured are really world class, and are a reason to visit Aberdeen in their own right.

Another popular tourist attraction is Royal Deeside, home to royal Balmoral Castle and the picturesque villages of Banchory, Aboyne, Ballater and Braemar. There are many coastal villages to explore in Aberdeen and Grampian. Tiny villages, picturesque harbours and 150-miles of unspoilt beaches line much of the coast which, together with the area's teeming wildlife (including dolphins, seals and seabirds), make the area an invigorating and uplifting holiday destination.

Aviemore

Aviemore

Aviemore, Scotland's leading ski resort, is nestled between the Cairngorms and the Monadhliath Mountains. It also serves as a good base for excursions into the surrounding countryside.
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Balmoral Castle

Balmoral Castle

Queen Elizabeth II's summer residence in Scotland has come to embody the Neo-baronial style of the Victorian era. The estate was first mentioned in documents in 1484 and, after Queen Victoria bought it in 1852.
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Craigievar Castle

Craigievar Castle

This delightful castle with its small towers, crowstepped gables, round oriel windows, quaint conical roofs, ornamental stone cannons and decorative zigzag console is proof that fairytales do come true.
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Crathes Castle

Crathes Castle

Run by the National Trust for Scotland, Crathes Castle is a classic example of a Scottish baronial style castle. The tower house with its small oriel windows, pretty corner towers and windows of varying sizes...
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Fyvie Castle

Fyvie Castle

Five families have played a part in the history of Fyvie Castle, and its five towers bear their names: the Preston Tower, Meldrum Tower, Seton Tower, Gordon Tower and Leith Tower.
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The Cairngorms

The Cairngorms

Britain's tallest and largest mountain range, the Cairngorms are home to the country's largest expanses of native forests and are widely regarded as one of Scotland's most stunning places of natural beauty.
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